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Vaccinations for dogs: what, when and how often to vaccinate?

Basic immunisation, compulsory vaccinations, optional vaccinations... Vaccinations protect your dog's life and the lives of other dogs. Vaccinating your four-legged friend helps to prevent the spread of known dangerous diseases. There are vaccinations against distemper, parvovirus, leptospirosis, hepatitis contagiosa canis, rabies, kennel cough, babesiosis and borreliosis. A general distinction is made between compulsory and optional vaccines. The pet passport records all vaccinations and the next vaccination dates. Which vaccinations are now an absolute must, how often does a dog need to be vaccinated and what is actually done during basic immunisation at puppy age? In this article we give you important information about vaccination.

The basic immunisation of the puppy

In the beginning, the antibodies in breast milk protect the puppies from possible infections. At the end of the suckling phase, at eight weeks, the first vaccination is due. This is called basic immunisation. This only activates the immune system and does not really protect the puppy. The second vaccination is then given at twelve weeks. Depending on the vaccine, the next vaccination is given at 16 weeks or 15 months.

Compulsory vaccinations

Most often, some or all vaccines are administered in a combined vaccination. The cost is usually between €50 and €80. As there is often uncertainty about the regularity or dates of compulsory vaccinations, we have prepared a table to help you keep track of everything.

Desease 

The basis immunisation 

The refreshment 

 

From 8 Weeks 

From 12 Weeks 

From 16 Weeks 

From 15 months 

Annually 

(depending on manufacturer) 

Every 3 years (depending on manufacturer) 

Distemper 

x 

x 

x 

x 

 

x 

Hepatitis 

x 

x 

x 

x 

 

x 

Parvovirose 

x 

x 

x 

x 

 

x 

Leptospirose 

x 

x 

 

x 

x 

x 

Rabies 

 

x 

x 

x 

 

x 

Distemper

Distemper is a dangerous and highly contagious viral disease that can lead to severe gastrointestinal problems, respiratory diseases and to fatal cramps and paralysis.

Parvovirose

Parvovirus is caused by the highly infectious and very resistant DNA virus CPV (canine parvovirus). It causes severe vomiting and high fever. Bloody diarrhoea also occurs frequently. Even if the dog apparently recovers, it often dies of the late effects.

Hepatitis contagiosa canis (H.c.c.)

If the dog has become infected with the canid adenovirus, which leads to hepatitis contagiosa canis, fever, kidney and eye infections occur. The virus can spread to the liver. There it causes extreme fatigue and gastro-intestinal problems. It is particularly fatal in young or weakened dogs.

Leptospirose

Leptospirosis is one of the diseases that can be transmitted from dogs to humans. It is transmitted by the bacterium Leptospira. This is usually found in contaminated soil or water. Unfortunately, the disease has spread considerably in recent years. It causes organ damage and is often fatal.

Rabies

Rabies is also transmissible to humans. In dogs, rabies is transmitted by the Lyssa virus. In dogs, rabies leads to heavy salivation, pain and increased aggressiveness. The disease always ends with death.

Elective vaccinations

Vaccinations against kennel cough, borreliosis, babesiosis and leishmaniasis can be useful in individual cases. Here it depends on whether your pelt-nose is chronically immunocompromised, for example. If complications are to be expected in your dog, for example an infection with kennel cough, vaccination is recommended. If you live in a Lyme disease region, a corresponding vaccination can also be useful here. The best thing to do is to ask the vet you trust for information.

Side effects of vaccination in dogs

Most dogs tolerate the vaccines well. However, it is important that your dog is healthy when you vaccinate him. He should also be free of worms and parasites, otherwise there is a higher chance of serious side effects. Common symptoms and milder side effects usually disappear after two to three days. Mild fever, fatigue, anorexia and a bump at the injection site are common after vaccinations and are usually harmless. Nevertheless, you should inform the vet as a precaution. The vet will decide whether your dog needs to be examined again or not. As with other drug treatments, it can be useful to support your dog's immune system before and after a vaccination. It is best to take a look at our Shop. Here you will find many little helpers such as our Multi Vital Pulver.

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